Friday, August 10, 2012

Plot vs Romance - what's your preferred mix?

Last week I wrote a review where I complained that the plot was a little too heavy on the romance and too light on the plot. The mix was about 85% romance 15% plot. Now I'm reading another book where I'm finding there isn't enough romance. It's 15% romance and 85% plot. I don't think this would bother me if not for the fact that the romance is a huge plot point, yet there's very little time spent developing the love between the characters. I'm left being "told" about their love, rather than "seeing" it unfold.

So now I'm wondering: Am I just too picky? I think my ideal is 65%-70% plot, and 30%-35% romance.

What's your ideal balance between romance and plot?

8 comments:

  1. Hm. Interesting. I don't think you're too picky. This happens to me too sometimes. Sometimes I think that there's way too much romance, and sometimes I think there's not enough. It might also have to deal with how the author's tell the story, like they're trying to add suspense, and sometimes it doesn't work out. It all depends on the novel and where the story is going, but more often than not, I kind of wished that there is more romance, as I am a bit of a romantic. Sorry, I went off on a ramble.

    Thanks for stopping by
    @ Livin' Life Through Books

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. @ Felicia -- I think your right. Although I think taste does play into it, how the author tells the story is also important.

      Delete
  2. I think I'd prefer the bigger proportion to be plot in most books. It depends on the story telling for me. And also how I feel about the characters and if the romance added anything to the plot. For example, the romance in the Kate Daniels series isn't a huge part of the books but it adds another layer to the already great plot. On the other hand, the romance in books like Daughter of Smoke and Bone and Shatter Me really killed the story. It just took over. I think it doesn't matter how much of each is in a book as long as they work to make the story stronger.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. @ Lan -- I agree, I didn't care for the romance in either Daughter of Smoke & Bone or Shatter Me. I do link romance as a subplot, or as you said, as another layer to an already great plot. I did like the romance in THG because it was realistic, though it did not take away from all the other important stuff going on.

      Delete
  3. I'm perfectly OK with no romance and all plot. Unfortunately there's always some dumb romance. ;) If the book doesn't pretend to be anything but a romance then I'm fine with it but none of this romance in the guise of plot. You know? You've just inspired me to look at ya paranormal books as romances strictly so I won't be disappointed. ;) I think I always expect more plot than I should.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. @ Jenny -- Yes, please, no romances disguised as plots, please! Unless of course you're into the romance genre, then I would guess it's something of a must. :)

      Delete
  4. For me it depends. If it's a romance novel, then I expect there to be a good amount of romance shown and not told. That would be the reason anyone would be reading the book. But, if the book is meant to be adventure, thriller, sci-fi, dystopia, fantasy, etc., then I would be annoyed by romance taking over more than 50% of the plot.

    This is exactly why I get so annoyed with a lot of YA sci-fi/fantasy these days because the books get billed as something like dystopia, urban fantasy, etc., when really they are romance novels. Why not just advertise a romance novel as a romance novel? Makes no sense and only aggravates me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. @ Cathy -- I totally agree! I've been thinking a lot lately about book marketing and finding your target audience. It's so important and can result in annoyed readers if not well thought out. It can also result in not even finding your readers!

      Delete