Sunday, May 13, 2012

E-readers vs. Amazon & Exclusivity

I have been a die-hard book fan all my life. I even love the way books smell. My first job in college was at Barnes and Noble. I used to come home literally smelling like paperbacks. The scent was all over my skin and my clothes, and I loved it.

11 months ago, I broke down a bought a Nook. The main reason being is that as an Indie Author, I thought I needed to be familiar with the ins and outs of ebooks. What better way to do that than to read ebooks?

I am now a convert. I love my Nook. I have purged my bookshelves. When I see book giveaway on blog sites, I don't enter because I don't want the clutter of another paperback.

About 6 months ago, Amazon started a new program for Kindle authors -- KDP, short for Kindle Select Program. When an author gives Amazon the exclusive right to their book for the first 3 months of its release, the author gets the benefits of KDP. These benefits include being a part of the Kindle lending library, as well as the ability to periodically give your book away for free.

As an indie author, this sounds like a good trade. I'm publishing a new book next June, and I intend to give it to Amazon on an exclusive basis for the first 3 months, just so I can take advantage of KDP perks.

As an owner of the Nook, it annoys the !*&$ out of me. Twice this past week, I tried to buy a book from B&N, only to find out it's only available on Amazon. Seriously, I have to wait 3 whole months to read that?!? Gah!

I've already told my husband that I am buying a Kindle in the near future, just to avoid this problem. Part of me thinks, Damn, Amazon is flipping brilliant. With one move, they've cornered a large segment of the book market AND found a way to give perks to indie authors. On the other hand, as a B&n customer, I am annoyed. B&N needs to figure out something creative to do for authors, or there are going to be more folks like me converting to Kindle.

I'm just wondering what other folks think about all this?

6 comments:

  1. I have a kindle so I can't help you out! I never realised KDP gave Amazon exclusive rights for 3 months. At least it's better than forever like a lot of traditional publishers. I wonder why B & N don't have their own program. It would seem like a logical step. I love my kindle but the paperback is still my true love. Any book that I love as an ebook I usually end up buying a paperback of anyway.

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    1. @ Lan -- I agree, I was thinking along the same lines. B&N is going to need to get innovative with indie authors if they want to stay in the race. :)

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  2. All I have is the Kindle App on my phone because it was free. I think Amazon is too smart for their own good. ;) I hope B&N comes up with something so you don't have to suffer anymore.

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    1. @ Jenny - Thanks! I know I am probably over-reactiing -- it's not like there aren't thousands of other books to chose from!

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  3. I'm not sure I like the KDP program, even though I love Amazon. I have a Kindle and everything, but I wouldn't do it if I were an indie author. Not having your book out there for everyone to purchase no matter how they want to buy it seems really stupid to me. The only good thing is that it only has to be that way for 3 months. Then, again, re-uploading it to all the other sites after taking them down has to be the biggest pain ever.

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    1. @ Cathy - as an indie author, I do have mixed feelings about the KDP program. I haven't tried it yet, although I am planning to give it a go on my next book. Amazon is the biggest kid in the sandbox, after all. :)

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